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大大大大大 http://bbs.TopSage.com Cambridge IELTS 6 Examination papers from University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations: English for Speakers of Other Languages 大大大大大大大 Cambridge IELTS 6 Word 大大大大 Introduction大 大大大大大大大 http://bbs.topsage.com/dispbbs_63_171664_1.html 大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大 大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大 大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大 大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大“大大大”大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大 Word 大大 大大大大大大大大大 PDF 大大大大大大大 大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大 大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大大 6 5 4 3 2 1 大大大大大大大 Word 大大 大大大大大 http://bbs.TopSage.com CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS 大大大大大 http://bbs.TopSage.com CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, São Paulo Cambridge University Press The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge C132 8RU, UK www.cambridge.org Information on this title: www.cambridge.org/9780521693073 Cambridge University Press 2007 It is normally necessary for written permission for copying to be obtained in advance from a publisher. The candidate answer sheets at the back of this book are designed to be copied and distributed in class. The normal requirements are waived here and it is not necessary to write to Cambridge University Press for permission for an individual teacher to make copies for use within his or her own classroom. Only those pages which carry the wording '© UCLES 2007 Photocopiable' may be copied. First published 2007 Printed in the United Kingdom at the University Press, Cambridge A catalogue record for this publication is available from the British Library ISBN 978-0-521-693073 Student's Book with answers ISBN 978-0-521-693097 Cassette Set ISBN 978-0-521-693103 Audio CD Set ISBN 978-0-521-693080 Self-study Pack Contents Introduction 4 Test 1 10 Test 2 33 Test 3 55 Test 4 78 General Training: Reading and Writing Test A 101 General Training: Reading and Writing Test B 114 Tapescripts 127 Answer key 151 Model and sample answers for Writing tasks 161 Sample answer sheets 173 Acknowledgements 176 Introduction The International English Language Testing System (IELTS) is widely recognised as a reliable means of assessing the language ability of candidates who need to study or work where English is the language of communication. These Practice Tests are designed to give future IELTS candidates an idea of whether their English is at the required level. IELTS is owned by three partners: the University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations, the British Council and IDP: Education Australia (through its subsidiary company, IELTS Australia Pty Limited). Further information on IELTS can be found on the IELTS website (www.ielts.org). WHAT IS THE TEST FORMAT? IELTS consists of six modules. All candidates take the same Listening and Speaking modules. There is a choice of Reading and Writing modules according to whether a candidate is taking the Academic or General Training version of the test. Academic For candidates taking the lest for entry to undergraduate or postgraduate studies or for professional reasons. General Training For candidates taking the test for entry to vocational or training programmes not at degree level, for admission to secondary schools and.for immigration purposes. The test modules arc taken in the following order: Listening 4 s e c t i o n s , 4 0 i t e m s approximately 30 minutes Academic Reading General Training Reading 3 sections, 40 items OR 3 sections, 40 items 60 minutes 60 minutes Academic 'Writing General Training Writing 2 tasks OR 2 tasks 60 minutes 60 minutes Speaking 11 to 14 minutes Total Test Time 2 hours 44 minutes 4 Introduction Listening This module consists of four sections, each with ten questions. The first two sections are concerned with social needs. The first section is a conversation between two speakers and the second section is a monologue. The final two sections arc concerned with situations related to educational or training contexts. The third section is a conversation between up to four people and the fourth section a monologue. A variety of question types is used, including: multiple choice, short-answer questions, sentence completion, notes/form/table/summary/flow-chart completion, labelling a diagram/plan/map, classification, matching. Candidates hear the recording once only and answer the questions as they listen. Ten minutes arc allowed at the end for candidates to transfer their answers to the answer sheet. Academic Reading This module consists of three sections with 40 questions. There are three reading passages, which are taken from magazines, journals, books and newspapers. The passages are on topics of general interest. At least one passage contains detailed logical argument. A variety of question types is used, including: multiple choice, short-answer questions, sentence completion, notes/summary/flow-chart/table completion, labelling a diagram, classification, matching, choosing suitable paragraph headings from a list, identification of writer's views/claims – yes, no, not given – or identification of information in the passage – true, false, not given. General Training Reading This module consists of three sections with 40 questions. The texts are taken from notices, advertisements, leaflets, newspapers, instruction manuals, books and magazines. The first section contains texts relevant to basic linguistic survival in English, with tasks mainly concerned with providing factual information. The second section focuses on the training context and involves texts of more complex language. The third section involves reading more extended texts, with a more complex structure, but with the emphasis on descriptive and instructive rather than argumentative texts. A variety of question types is used, including: multiple choice, short-answer questions, sentence completion, notes/summary/flow-chart/table completion, labelling a diagram, classification, matching, choosing suitable paragraph headings from a list, identification of writer's views/claims – yes, no, not given – identification of information in the text – true, false, not given. Academic Writing This module consists of two tasks. It is suggested that candidates spend about 20 minutes on Task I, which requires them to write at least 150 words, and 40 minutes on Task 2, which requires them to write at least 250 words. The assessment of Task 2 carries more weight in marking than Task 1. Task I requires candidates to look at a diagram or some data (graph, table or chart) and to present the information in their own words. They are assessed on their ability to organise, present and possibly compare data, describe the stages of a process, describe an object or event, or explain how something works. 5 Introduction In Task 2 candidates are presented with a point of view, argument or problem. They are assessed on their ability to present a solution to the problem, present and justify an opinion, compare and contrast evidence and opinions, and evaluate and challenge ideas, evidence or arguments. Candidates are also assessed on their ability to write in an appropriate style. General Training Writing This module consists of two tasks. It is suggested that candidates spend about 20 minutes on Task 1, which requires them to write at least 150 words, and 40 minutes on Task 2, which requires them to write at least 250 words. The assessment of Task 2 carries more weight in marking than Task 1. In Task 1 candidates are asked to respond to a given problem with a letter requesting information or explaining a situation. They are assessed on their ability to engage in personal correspondence, elicit and provide general factual information, express needs, wants, likes and dislikes, express opinions, complaints, etc. In Task 2 candidates are presented with a point of view, argument or problem. They are assessed on their ability to provide general factual information, outline a problem and present a solution, present and justify an opinion, and evaluate and challenge ideas, evidence or arguments, Candidates are also judged on their ability to write in an appropriate style. More information on assessing both the Academic and General Training Writing modules, including Writing Band Descriptors (public version), is available on the IELTS website. Speaking This module takes between 11 and 14 minutes and is conducted by a trained examiner. There are three parts: Part 1 The candidate and the examiner introduce themselves. Candidates then answer general questions about themselves, their home/family, their job/studies, their interests and a wide range of similar familiar topic areas. This part lasts between four and live minutes. Part 2 The candidate is given a task card with prompts and is asked to talk on a particular topic. The candidate has one minute to prepare and they can make some notes if they wish, before speaking for between one and two minutes. The examiner then asks one or two rounding-off questions. Part 3 The examiner and the candidate engage in a discussion of more abstract issues which are thematically linked to the topic prompt in Part 2. The discussion lasts between four and five minutes. The Speaking module assesses whether candidates can communicate effectively in English. The assessment takes into account Fluency and Coherence, Lexical Resource, Grammatical 6 Introduction Range and Accuracy, and Pronunciation. More information on assessing the Speaking module, including Speaking Band Descriptors (public version), is available on the IELTS website. HOW IS IELTS SCORED? IELTS results are reported on a nine-band scale. In addition to the score for overall language ability, IELTS provides a score in the form of a profile for each of the four skills (Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking). These scores are also reported on a nine-band scale. All scores are recorded on the Test Report Form along with details of the candidate's nationality, first language and date of birth. Each Overall Band.

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